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Improving Industrial Energy Efficiency In Singapore

20 Oct 2017

New requirements will include Minimum Energy Performance Standards for motors and energy efficiency opportunities assessment and energy performance measurement for new industrial facilities and major expansions

Singapore, 20 October 2017 – From 1 October 2018, NEA will be introducing new requirements under the Energy Conservation Act (ECA) to improve the energy efficiency of electric motors supplied in the Singapore market, and improve the energy efficiency of new industrial facilities and major expansions of industrial facilities. These requirements are part of the enhancements to the Energy Conservation Act that were announced at the 2017 Committee of Supply Debate. The industrial sector is the largest energy consumer and contributes more than half of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Singapore. These enhancements will help Singapore achieve its pledge under the Paris Agreement on climate change to reduce emissions intensity[1] by 36% from 2005 levels by 2030, and to stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions with the aim of peaking around 2030.

 Extension of Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) to Motors

2          Based on the energy use reports submitted by companies regulated under the ECA, electric motors accounted for about 80% of their electricity consumption in 2015. Electric motors are found in almost every industrial application such as crushing, grinding, mixing, pumping, conveying, compression, cooling and refrigeration.

3              The introduction of MEPS for motors will lead to the phase out of inefficient motor models from the market and catalyse the transformation of the market towards more efficient models. Besides enjoying life-cycle cost savings from lower electricity consumption, companies will also reduce their carbon footprint.

4              The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)[2] categorises motors into four energy efficiency classes, namely Standard (IE1), High (IE2), Premium (IE3) and Super Premium (IE4). To align with international standards, MEPS for motors in Singapore will be set at IE3 level from 1 October 2018. Refer to Annex A for details of requirements.

5              Between April 2016 and July 2017, NEA consulted industry and the public on the introduction of MEPS for motors. Motor suppliers were also given early notice at two industry briefings in June 2017 to prepare for the implementation of MEPS.  NEA will regularly review the efficiency standards of motors to keep pace with technological improvements and to encourage suppliers to bring in more energy efficient and cost effective models.

Energy Efficiency Opportunities Assessment for New Facilities and Major Expansions

6          For new facilities, many system design synergies to improve energy efficiency are only available early in the design process before system choices are fixed. It becomes far costlier and less effective to retrofit or improve a facility for energy efficiency after it has been built. Designing a facility to be energy and resource efficient allows companies to benefit from lower capital expenditure at the outset by right-sizing equipment and systems, and lower operating and maintenance costs from lower resource and energy use.

7          To encourage companies to design facilities to be energy efficient, from 1 October 2018, NEA will require companies investing in new facilities or major expansions that are designed to consume 54 tera-joules (TJ) or more of energy annually to: a) review the facility design for energy efficiency; b) identify economically feasible energy efficiency opportunities for incorporation into the facility design; and c) report the findings to NEA.

Refer to Annex B for details of this requirement.

Energy Performance Measurement for New Facilities and Major Expansions

 

8          Measurements are critical to continual energy efficiency improvement as managing energy use is a data-driven activity. As it is less disruptive and more cost-effective to install measurement systems in new facilities and major expansions, from 1 October 2018 onwards, companies investing in new facilities or major expansions to their facilities that are designed to consume 54TJ or more of energy annually will be required to plan for and install instruments and meters for key energy-consuming systems.[3] The companies must also report energy use and energy performance indicators based on measured data in their ECA submissions. Refer to Annex C for details of this requirement.

9        For more information, please contact us at 1800-CALL NEA (1800-2255 632).



[1] Emissions Intensity refers to GHG emissions per dollar of GDP, measured in CO2-equivalent per dollar.

[2] IEC 60034-30-1: 2014

[3] Systems that account for at least 80% of a facility’s total energy consumption.

~~ End ~~

For more information, please contact us at 1800-CALL NEA (1800-2255 632) or submit your enquiries electronically via the Online Feedback Form or myENV mobile application.

 

ANNEX A

 

MEPS for Motors - Details of Requirement

A)           Scope of MEPS for Motors

1              With effect from 1 October 2018, MEPS for motors will cover single speed, three-phase 50 Hz induction motors that have:                                                   

a)      2, 4 and 6 poles;

b)      rated output power from 0.75 kW to 375 kW;

c)      rated voltage up to 1,000 V; and

d)      rated on the basis of continuous duty operation.

2          The following classes of motors, which are intended for special purposes or are uncommon, will not be covered under MEPS:


B)           Registration and Testing

3              Suppliers of motors and motor-driven equipment/systems must register themselves and their motor models with NEA. Each registration is valid for a 3-year period and has to be renewed if the supplier intends to continue supplying the product in Singapore. The registration and renewal fee per motor model are $57 and $32 respectively.

4              During the registration, suppliers must produce test reports to demonstrate compliance with the requirements specified under MEPS. Test reports from any of the following testing laboratories will be accepted:

a)      Manufacturers’ in-house testing laboratories;

b)      Testing laboratories that are accredited by the Singapore Accreditation Council (SAC) to carry out the test in accordance with the applicable test standards; or

c)      Testing laboratories in other countries that are accredited by their local accreditation bodies that have signed a Mutual Recognition Arrangement with SAC to carry out the test in accordance with the applicable test standards.

5             The test standards - IEC 60034-2-1:2014 (method 2-1-1B) or IEEE[4] 112:2004 (method B) will be adopted as they are internationally recognised and adopted by countries like USA, those in the EU, China and South Korea.

6              A registered supplier will be required to display on the motor nameplate the year of manufacture, IE efficiency classand nominal efficiency at 100%, 75% and 50% rated load[5] before the motor can be sold.  Such information will allow the end-user of a motor to ascertain whether the motor is MEPS-compliant.

C)           Verification Testing

7             NEA will from time to time carry out verification testing on registered motor models to ensure compliance with the MEPS requirements. All verification testing will be carried out in accordance with the applicable test standards.

ANNEX B

EEOA for New Ventures - Details of Requirement

1          With effect from 1 October 2018, an energy efficiency opportunities assessment (EEOA) must be conducted for a new facility or major expansion (new venture) and an EEOA report must be submitted to NEA, if:

a)      The owner of the new venture applies for planning permission under the Planning Act (Cap 232) for the new venture on or after 1 October 2018

b)      The calculated Annual Energy Consumption of the new venture is ≥54TJ based on 365 days of operations at 100% designed production capacity

c)      The business activity of the new venture is carried out at a single site and is from one of the industry sectors[6] listed in the Energy Management (Registrable Corporations) Order 2013

2          The EEOA process includes the following:

a)      Develop a plan to conduct the EEOA, which must detail the scope, objectives, and assessment method of the EEOA

b)      Identify energy efficiency opportunities during the Concept Engineering stage by considering:

i. Optimum methods or processes to produce outputs
ii. Alternative technology choices

c)      Identify energy efficiency opportunities, for energy-consuming systems that make up at least 80% of the total energy consumed, as calculated in the Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) stage, considering:

i Location and arrangement of equipment to allow opportunities such as heat transfer between processes

ii. Best available technologies and best operating practices

iii. Alternative technology choices

d)      Assess the feasibility of implementing each energy efficiency opportunity identified in (b) and (c), based on the following criteria:

i. Cost of investment

ii. Operations cost

iii. Annual energy savings as compared to a proposed option

iv. Financial savings

v. Payback period or internal rate of return

vi. Annual carbon emissions

vii. Other criteria, economic or otherwise, where appropriate

viii. Other non-energy benefits (e.g. improvement in productivity)

ix. Potential interactions between various opportunities

e)      Incorporate shortlisted energy efficiency opportunities into a final design, and calculating the energy and carbon savings from each of these opportunities incorporated

f)       Develop a final design with the following details:

i. Layout, energy balance and process flow diagram of the new venture

ii. Expected annual energy consumption, by type(s) of fuel or energy commodity

iii. Expected quantity of output(s)

iv. Expected specific energy consumption (energy consumed divided by output)

v. Expected annual carbon emissions

vi. For energy-consuming systems that make up at least 80% of the calculated total energy consumption of the new venture:

  • Type and description of system
  • Projected annual energy consumption, by type(s) of fuel or energy commodity
  • Projected output
  • Projected specific energy consumption
  • Projected annual carbon emissions

3          The EEOA report must be submitted at the point of application for a Development Control (DC) Clearance Certificate from NEA. The EEOA report shall include the following:

a)      An executive summary of the report

b)      Background of new venture and EEOA plan

c)      Details of the final design (as spelled out in point 2 (f) above)

d)      Expected energy use and specific energy consumption of the new venture, at the Concept Engineering and FEED stages

e)      Process of identification and analysis of energy efficiency opportunities, during the Concept Engineering stage, and for energy-consuming systems that make up at least 80% of the calculated total energy consumption of the new venture in the FEED stage. The analysis for each opportunity shall include:

i. An explanation why it was selected/ not selected

ii. Energy performance relative to the system in the design

iii. Cost of investment

iv. Estimated cost of operations

v. Expected annual energy savings and reduction in carbon emissions compared to the system in the design

vi. Expected financial return

vii. Payback period or internal rate of return

ANNEX C

Energy Performance Measurement - Details of Requirement

1             The owner of a new venture who applies for planning permission under the Planning Act (Cap 232) on or after 1 October 2018 will need to declare its intent to plan for and install instruments and meters to enable tracking of energy use and energy performance indicators[7] of energy-consuming systems.  The declaration is to be carried out through a Qualified Person, during the application for a Development Control Clearance Certificate from NEA.

2             When new ventures commence operations and consumed ≥54TJ of energy annually in at least 2 out of the 3 preceding years, they will be regulated as a Registered Corporation under the ECA.  Such corporations will have to report the following as measured values:

a)      Total energy consumption of the new venture; and

b)      Annual energy consumption, intended output and specific energy consumption figures of energy-consuming systems that make up at least 80% of the calculated total energy consumption of the new venture.


 

[4] The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

[5] Where the size of the name plate makes it impossible to display all the information, only the nominal efficiency at 100% load shall be displayed

[6] i. Manufacturing and manufacturing related services:

a)    manufacturing, testing or assembly of products

b)    processing of materials or products

c)     building, repairing or servicing of equipment and machinery

d)    printing

e)    reproduction of recorded media

f)      other types of manufacturing

  ii. Supply of electricity, gas, steam, compressed air and chilled water for air-conditioning:

a)    generation, transmission or distribution of electricity

b)    production or distribution of gas

c)     production or supply of steam

d)    production or supply of compressed air

e)    production or supply of chilled water for air‑conditioning

 iii. Water supply and sewage and waste management:

a)    collection, treatment or supply of water

b)    operation of sewer systems or treatment of sewage

c)     collection (except by vehicles), treatment or disposal of waste

d)    recovery of materials through recycling

[7] The energy performance indicators refer to the specific energy consumption (SEC) of energy-consuming systems in the energy use report specified in the ECA.